Jaw Stability/Jaw Grading in Tongue Thrust

TongueThrust Eng Vowel Ex Pix page jpgIf you have a student or client with tongue thrust (as known as oral myofunctional disorder)  you may need some information about the jaw.

Learn more about the jaw here and see my resources for therapy ideas on Teachers Pay Teachers.com.

Vowel QuadrilateralThe vowels are often affected by the position of the jaw. If you are teaching English pronunciation to a foreign-born speaker, they may improve their low vowels /ae/ as in /cat/, and /ah/ as in /pot/, if they open their mouth wider (move their jaw to a low jaw position).

See my free printable English Vowel Quadrilateral here.

See my free printable Mouth Openings Pictures & Words Page here.

The entire Tongue Thrust/Jaw Stability handout packet is available on TeachersPayTeachers.

10 Ways to Improve your English

10 Ways to Improve Your EnglishImprove_English_ESL_classes_SanJose_CA

Speaking

1.Join an ESL class for regular practice in English.

2.Practice with a native English speaker every day for a few minutes. Tell your American friend, neighbor or workmate you are trying to improve your English, and ask them to chat with you each day.

3.Learn English sounds and pronunciation rules. Most helpful to learn are TH, R,L and the different vowel sounds. Use the expected stress in longer words. Learn to link your words together smoothly in a sentence, and not pronounce each word separately.

Listening

4.Watch TV programs with the subtitles on. Pre-recorded shows are best. Newscasts and live shows will have a lag between the dialogue and the printed caption.

5.“Eavesdrop” on English speakers around you. Listen to others conversations and try to figure out what they’re saying.

6.Listen to books on CD. It may help to have the printed book to look at as you listen. Listen without text for an added challenge. Check you public library for books on CD.

Reading

7.Read “easy reader” or “graded readers” children’s books. Your public library has hundreds of easy readers in the ‘juvenile’ section.

Writing

8.Write more in English – letters, emails, cards, or keep a diary.

Vocabulary

9.Keep a small notebook handy for jotting down new words and their meanings. Review your list and use new words in a sentence to help memorize them.

General

10.Make a goal for your English learning. Setting a goal is the best way to improve a skill.

Click here for the free printable 10 Ways to Improve Your English.

(Reprinted with permission – original post 4/23/12015)

New Tongue Thrust Printables

Tongue Thrust TherapyPlease stop by my store at Teachers Pay Teachers.  I’ve published some useful materials for working with students who tongue thrust.

Tongue Thrust Exercises and Activities

Tongue Thrust Words and Sentences

Paper Suck Tic Tac Toe

What is tongue thrust and why is it important to correct?  A heavy force such as chewing only occupies a small amount of time each day.  Contrast that with swallowing at every meal, as well as the regular swallowing of saliva.  Swallowing happens hundreds of times each day and night.

For some, the tongue is not positioned correctly for the hundreds of times each day and night that swallowing occurs.  Instead of lifting up against the roof of the mouth as it should, the tongue stays low and “thrusts” forward, and often through the teeth. Others rest their tongue in a more forward position than expected.  This constant force is tongue thrust, and creates a space between the teeth that impacts the normal development of the teeth, tongue, lips, jaw and face.  It often impacts clear and understandable speech.  All babies use tongue thrust as a safety mechanism when eating.  But children are expected to grow out of this by age 5 – 7.

Use the search above to look for tongue thrust, also called myofunctional disorders.

 

 

Linking Vowel to Vowel Using W or Y

Linking Vowel to VowelLinking a vowel to a vowel in English will sound smoother with adding a W or a Y sound.

Here are the rules.

Rule #1.  When a word ending in iy, ey, ay or oy is followed by a vowel, use Y

  • Be a sport = Beya sport.
  • Play a game = Playa game.
  • Tie it up = Tiyit up.
  • Employ a professional = Employa professional.

Rule #2.  When  a word ending in uw, ow or aw is followed by a vowel , use W

  • through it all = throughwit all
  • slow and steady = slowand steady
  • How are you? = Howare you?

See the free printable here (includes teacher notes and key.) These pages are from this resource for linking Hawaii EDU Pronunciation

Tongue Twister Fun

Tongue Twisters ESL English PronunciationTongue Twisters are poems that are tricky to pronounce, even for native speakers!

Trying to say a tongue twister poem fast often has hilarious results!  But they can be very good practice when you say them slowly.  Here are a few of my favorites: She Sells Seashells, Peter Piper and How Much Wood?

  • She sells seashells by the seashore.
  • The shells she sells are surely seashells.
  • So if she sells shells by the seashore,
  • I’m sure she sells seashore shells.

Hear the audio clip She Sells Seashells.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

  • Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers.
  • If Peter Piper Picked a peck of pickled peppers,
  • Where’s the peck of pickled peppers Peter Piper picked?

Hear the audio clip Peter Piper.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

  • How much wood would a woodchuck chuck
  • If a woodchuck could chuck wood?

Hear the audio clip How Much Wood?

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Click here for a free printable worksheet – Tongue Twisters

Shortcut for Pronouncing -ed Endings

Shortcut -ed endingsPronouncing -ed endings correctly makes a big difference.  When a student can pronounce the -ed endings he will be much easier to understand.  Comprehensible English is the goal of accent modification.

There is a common method of teaching -ed endings by using /d/, /t/ and /id/.  This was a little confusing for my lower students, so I developed a “shortcut” to pronouncing -ed endings.

Words ending in T or D, add ‘id’ and say it as a separate syllable.

Words ending in all other sounds, add “d” and DON’T say it as a separate syllable.

Important tip!  Beginning D is said with a puff of air.  Ending D is said with NO PUFF OF AIR!  This is helpful, when students say “gooda” for good,  “hadda” for had, “playeda” for played or “moveda” for moved. No puff of air here will help your student’s English to be more comprehensible.

See the free printable Pronouncing -ed Shortcut handout here.

Have fun speaking English!

Reducing “Your” and “Our”

Pronouncing your our Accent Reduction Classes San Jose CAHave you learned these common reductions of English?

  • “gonna” is a reduction of “going to”
  • “hafta” is a reduction of “have to”
  • “I wanna” is a reduction of “I want to…”
  • “I gotta…” is a reduction of “I’ve got to…”

Some think reduced English forms are lazy or sloppy, BUT THEY ARE NOT.  Reduced forms are EXPECTED in most conversations, in both casual and formal settings. Your American listener is expecting reductions of English grammar in order to communicate in a fast and efficient way.

English listeners are also expecting linking.  See my previous post on How Linking Improves your Pronunciation.

Reducing your and our is very common in conversation. Your (also you’re)  is reduced to yer, and our is reduced to ar.  Some examples might sound like this:

  • Is he coming to yer house?
  • I want to see yer boss.
  • Yer going to college? (you’re)
  • I want yer opinion.
  • Should we go away for ar anniversary?
  • Ar class is cancelled today.
  • An animal dug up ar yard.
  • Ar post office is closed now.

See my 2016 free printable on reductions here.

 

 

 

How to Link An to Words Starting with Vowels

IMG_2644[1]In English, we use articles (a, an or the) before nouns.  If the coming word starts with a vowel, we use “an” and link /n/ sound to the word.

actor: an actor >anactor

expert: an expert > anexpert

author: an author > anauthor

If linking these words together, is unfamilar to you, you can practice the pattern in words like

another

anatomy

initial

Here’s a free printable list of words and sentences for practicing linking the “an” to the coming word.

Keep up the good work speaking English!

 

 

Using a Stress Ball to Teach English Stress & Intonation

english stress lessonWhen you teach English stress you must emphasise the strong and weak parts of words and sentences. I do this by using a child’s play ball.

Teach the basics: Strong stress will sound longer, louder and have a higher pitch. Weak stress will sound shorter, quieter and have a lower pitch.

Practice it with words: com PU ter, SA tur day

Use the ball to show the stress intonation. For com PU ter, hold the ball low-high-low.  for SA ter day, hold the ball high-low-low.

I like to have the students move the ball in a left-to-right progression.  This is how we read in English. Since I stand in front of them, I use right-to-left, and they copy me (mirror-like) and do left-to-right.

stress intonation EnglishThe balls I use in class can be purchased at a party supply or toy store, and they should be about 3 inches in diameter.  Large enough to fit comfortably in the hand.  The soft ones, or the ones designed to use as water toys, are best.  Bouncy balls will go shooting, or rolling, across the room when dropped.  The soft balls do not roll away.

I like these stress game activities from Mark Hancock’s Pronunciation Games book.pronunciation games  Hancock is writing about British English, so some of the words may have an unexpected spelling or accent, and may not be appropriate if you are teaching North American English.  Still it’s a good resource.  I introduce the Rhythm Dominoes first (just the lesson, no game) because there are only 6 stress patterns covered.  More advanced classes can play the dominoes game afterward.

Then I do the Fishing game next.  It has 11 stress patterns so it will take more time to go through and have your students practice.  Whether you play the Rhythm Dominoes or the Fishing games, help your students by practicing the stress patterns many times.  Some students might even need hand-over-hand demonstration of how the pattern rises and falls.  So be prepared to put your hand over theirs and help them make the rising and falling movements.

It may help with multi-syllable words to instruct students to “jump” up, and “step” down in the intonation.

You may notice that weak syllables may have reduced vowels, and I explain that more in the next post.