Reflecting on Pronunciation Class at the End of the Year

ESL Class Pronunciation Class San Jose CAWe had our last ESL English Pronunciation class yesterday. I have been thinking about what worked well this year, and what could be improved.  I love to survey the students at the end of the year.  Their responses help me to get a better idea of what they liked and didn’t like.  Here’s a free printable of my class “end-of-the-year” class survey.

They all wanted more talking time.  That shouldn’t surprise me since teachers talking too much is the No. 1 complaint of ESL learners everywhere!  So next year I’m going to use my student teachers to break into small groups more often.

The homework I give is really effective. Developed after 5 years of teaching, I’m pleased with the homework portion of class.  I give students a listening assignment – using web sources, they pick one audio clip (about 1 minute), listen to it, then write a brief summary of what the audio clip was about. In class they read their paragraph outloud.  This homework targets listening, writing, grammar, vocabulary and speaking. So the words they use to recall the paragraph are the words they read out in class.  This is different from reading a random paragraph the teacher chooses.  Because it actually targets the real vocabulary and grammar the students use!  See my previous post on listening homework with a free printable of my Pronunciation Class Homework.

They wanted grammar correction.  Since I focus on helping them pronounce English I usually stick to sounds, linking, reductions  and intonation in sentences and conversation.  I have not been correcting grammar very much, or very explicitly.  Since the class is only 1 hour, 40 minutes (and a few of them arrive late) they really isn’t much time to correct grammar.  I might be able to improve this if I use my student teachers in small groups more.

I want to try using more movement in class next year.  mostly I just taught at the front of hte class and wrote on the board.  I’d like to do more picture description too.  I think this may stretch the students even more.

Jaw Stability/Jaw Grading in Tongue Thrust

TongueThrust Eng Vowel Ex Pix page jpgIf you have a student or client with tongue thrust (as known as oral myofunctional disorder)  you may need some information about the jaw.

Learn more about the jaw here and see my resources for therapy ideas on Teachers Pay Teachers.com.

Vowel QuadrilateralThe vowels are often affected by the position of the jaw. If you are teaching English pronunciation to a foreign-born speaker, they may improve their low vowels /ae/ as in /cat/, and /ah/ as in /pot/, if they open their mouth wider (move their jaw to a low jaw position).

See my free printable English Vowel Quadrilateral here.

See my free printable Mouth Openings Pictures & Words Page here.

The entire Tongue Thrust/Jaw Stability handout packet is available on TeachersPayTeachers.

10 Ways to Improve your English

10 Ways to Improve Your EnglishImprove_English_ESL_classes_SanJose_CA

Speaking

1.Join an ESL class for regular practice in English.

2.Practice with a native English speaker every day for a few minutes. Tell your American friend, neighbor or workmate you are trying to improve your English, and ask them to chat with you each day.

3.Learn English sounds and pronunciation rules. Most helpful to learn are TH, R,L and the different vowel sounds. Use the expected stress in longer words. Learn to link your words together smoothly in a sentence, and not pronounce each word separately.

Listening

4.Watch TV programs with the subtitles on. Pre-recorded shows are best. Newscasts and live shows will have a lag between the dialogue and the printed caption.

5.“Eavesdrop” on English speakers around you. Listen to others conversations and try to figure out what they’re saying.

6.Listen to books on CD. It may help to have the printed book to look at as you listen. Listen without text for an added challenge. Check you public library for books on CD.

Reading

7.Read “easy reader” or “graded readers” children’s books. Your public library has hundreds of easy readers in the ‘juvenile’ section.

Writing

8.Write more in English – letters, emails, cards, or keep a diary.

Vocabulary

9.Keep a small notebook handy for jotting down new words and their meanings. Review your list and use new words in a sentence to help memorize them.

General

10.Make a goal for your English learning. Setting a goal is the best way to improve a skill.

Click here for the free printable 10 Ways to Improve Your English.

(Reprinted with permission – original post 4/23/12015)

KT for Chinese Speakers

esl-studentsHere’s help for Chinese speakers to get a more American English sound.  When consonantsc” (k) and “t” are in the middle of a word (like “practice”), or between two words in a phrase. (like “take two”), hold out the vowel just before the “k” sound, then make a gentle, quiet “k” linked to the “t”.

DO NOT fully pronounce the ‘k’ sound or it will sound like pra  KA  tice (practice) or da KA tor (doctor).

Listen to the audio here.

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practice

pra——>  ktis

doctor

do——-> ktor

active

a——-> ktiv

factor

fa——>kter

Free printable list of KT words here.

 

 

Understanding Can and Can’t

Understanding Can & Can'tA student in English Pronunciation class asked how to make “can” and “can’t” different, because when she hears Americans use these words it’s hard to tell them apart! Sometimes you hear the T on “can’t”, but not always.  There is an easier way to know the difference:

When we use “can” (affirmative), the vowel often gets reduced, and sounds like “kin” or “kun”.

But with “can’t” (negative), the vowel never gets reduced.  It always sounds like a short A sound.

“I can [kin] do it.” “Can [kin] you call me?” “We can [kin] go.”

“I can’t [kant] do it.” “Can’t [kant] you call me?” “We can’t [kant] go.”

 

 

 

 

List of ESL Classes for 2016-2017

ESL teacher classes San Jose CAClasses start September 12th.  We’ll have 8 classes this year at WestGate South Hills Church, Mondays 9:30-11:30am  6601 Camden Avenue, San Jose CA 95120.  Free child care available.  Intermediate and advanced students may choose the Literacy class, or the Pronunciation class.  Printable list of classes here.

List of ESL Classes     2016-2017

WestGate South Hills

Beginning ESL Class 1

Beginning ESL Class 2

  • Students learn beginning vocabulary, grammar, conversation and American culture

Intermediate ESL Class 1

Intermediate ESL Class 2

  • Students learn intermediate vocabulary, grammar, conversation and American culture

Advanced ESL Class 1

Advanced ESL Class 2

  • Students learn advanced vocabulary, grammar, conversation and American culture

English Pronunciation Class – speaking/listening

  • English Pronunciation is for improving English speaking, as well as understanding American English speakers better.
  • Intermediate 2 and Advanced 1 & 2 ESL students are eligible.
  • Students will listen and speak using American English sounds, rhythm, intonation, linking and reductions. They will improve pronunciation through modeling and repetition.

English Literacy Class – reading/writing

  • English Literacy is for improving English reading and writing.
  • Intermediate 2 and Advanced 1 & 2 ESL students are eligible. Students should be proficient in listening to and speaking English.
  • Students will read, discuss reading, increase vocabulary, and improve spelling and grammar through writing.

ESL Class Registration Form

ESL flyer 2016 2017ESL Classes start Monday, September 12th. No need to preregister! Just show up on Monday. Pay your $10 and fill out your registration form. Click here to get your registration form now in English or Spanish and fill it out, so you’re ready to go on Monday! Or we’ll have blank forms at the registration table.

9:30-11:30 am Monday, September 12, 2016.

6601 Camden Avenue, San Jose, CA 95120

Linking Vowel to Vowel Using W or Y

Linking Vowel to VowelLinking a vowel to a vowel in English will sound smoother with adding a W or a Y sound.

Here are the rules.

Rule #1.  When a word ending in iy, ey, ay or oy is followed by a vowel, use Y

  • Be a sport = Beya sport.
  • Play a game = Playa game.
  • Tie it up = Tiyit up.
  • Employ a professional = Employa professional.

Rule #2.  When  a word ending in uw, ow or aw is followed by a vowel , use W

  • through it all = throughwit all
  • slow and steady = slowand steady
  • How are you? = Howare you?

See the free printable here (includes teacher notes and key.) These pages are from this resource for linking Hawaii EDU Pronunciation

Tongue Twister Fun

Tongue Twisters ESL English PronunciationTongue Twisters are poems that are tricky to pronounce, even for native speakers!

Trying to say a tongue twister poem fast often has hilarious results!  But they can be very good practice when you say them slowly.  Here are a few of my favorites: She Sells Seashells, Peter Piper and How Much Wood?

  • She sells seashells by the seashore.
  • The shells she sells are surely seashells.
  • So if she sells shells by the seashore,
  • I’m sure she sells seashore shells.

Hear the audio clip She Sells Seashells.

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  • Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers.
  • If Peter Piper Picked a peck of pickled peppers,
  • Where’s the peck of pickled peppers Peter Piper picked?

Hear the audio clip Peter Piper.

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  • How much wood would a woodchuck chuck
  • If a woodchuck could chuck wood?

Hear the audio clip How Much Wood?

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Click here for a free printable worksheet – Tongue Twisters